Cranbrook

I am dissecting my own relationship with occupied structures by collecting and building objects. I have found that my processes have expanded as I come to understand my own relationship on the broad subject of the house, and my desires associated with stability. I have come across this fixation through anxieties around inconsistency in what “home” is and the lack of permanence it has throughout my life. I also believe this anxiety is a collective worry within our world. While those anxieties for a long time cornered my making, I found fluidity and interest in the work from a constructive outlook on the dismal scenarios in the housing world. I began by focusing on the exterior of structures when I set out on this body of work tracing back to 2017. I, however, began to feel exhausted with the graphic and literal nature of my work and found that they held me and viewers at arms length. This exhaustion has led me to explore additions back into my work that I had previously stripped out like: furniture, interior space, lighting, and limited functionality. Rather than literal recreations of buildings, I began to focus on my own objects that I have traveled with and defined my own space. This shifted my work from sculptures to objects and arrangements, and I find relief working in a more abstract way. This reacquaintance with interior spaces and furniture objects allows the work to move freely in and out of the recognizable and the weird. Interior and exterior have a hand in this back and forth. My newer abstract forms house my miniatures of objects that define my home. These real furniture objects have escaped all logic of functionality and convenience in my very mobile way of living.